Nov 18, 2022 - Improving mental health among newcomer youth through school-based community partnerships

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This presentation by Professor Sita Patel at the Palo Alto University and Global Mental Health Fellow for WHO, will share several field examples to illustrate common challenges and best practices for conducting school-based research that aims to better understand and improve newcomer youth mental health. Schools provide an accessible, common ground for the delivery of mental health services for newly arrived immigrant children and adolescents. Given competing demands and limited resources in many schools, it is vital to consider ways to optimize community engagement, youth outcomes, and program longevity.

To join us on Monday, December 5th at 10:30 am (ET) please register ahead of time here.


Nov 04, 2022 - DACA Moving Forward: What Can We Expect? 

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On Monday, Nov 14th 10:30 EST,   the Immigration Imitative at Harvard will host a panel discussion on

DACA Moving Forward: What Can We Expect? with panelists:

  • Andrew Selee, President of the Migration Policy Institute.
  • Juliana Macedo do Nascimento, Director of Federal Advocacy at United We Dream
  • Javier Juarez, Senior Director of Advancement for the Massachusetts Immigrant & Refugee Advocacy Coalition
  • Jason Corral, Staff attorney for the Harvard Representation Initiative

Moderated by Carola Suárez-Orozco, Director Immigration Initiative at Harvard

To watch the recording, please click here.  


Oct 31, 2022 - Presentation | Marta Rodriguez | “Stereotype and stigma in the school (re)insertion of children of deported parents”

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Marta Rodríguez-Cruz is a Professor and Researcher in the Department of Social Anthropology at the University of Seville and a Visiting Professor at the Center for Mexican Studies UNAM-Boston. To watch the recording please click here


Oct 17, 2022 - “Supporting immigrant-origin students in US public school districts: Reflections from a mixed-methods research study”

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This interdisciplinary research team will present key insights from an ongoing mixed-methods research study of educator practices in 6 immigrant-serving school districts in distinct contexts of reception. They will share an overview of our project, present insights from three key analyses, and reflect on our partnership with district leaders to document and develop promising practices to support immigrant-origin students.

Presenters:

Dr. Rebecca Lowenhaupt (co-PI; Boston College)Dr Ariana Mangual Figueroa (CUNY Graduate Center).Paulette Andrade Gonzalez (Boston College)Jennifer Queenan (CUNY Graduate Center)Edom Tesfa (Harvard University)

To watch the recording, please click here. Open to all but please register ahead!

 


Oct 05, 2022 - Presentation | Sophia Rodriguez, University of Maryland. “We learn about who we are..”: Community-based organizations as spaces of belonging for newcomer unaccompanied immigrant youth and research dilemmas”.

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Prof. Sophia Rodriguez of UMD will speak on “We learn about who we are…”: Community-based organizations as spaces of belonging for newcomer unaccompanied immigrant youth and research dilemmas” for the kick-off 2022/23 IIH Colloquium. To watch the recording, please click here.


Aug 15, 2022 - America’s Immigration Debate: Doris Meissner, Norman Ornstein, Carola Suarez-Orozco, & Julia Preston

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Listen to a discussion with a panel of immigration experts moderated by Robert Siegel (host of NPR’s All Things Considered for 31 years) on the prospects of immigration reform:

  • Doris Meissner (Migration Policy Institute)
  • Carola Suárez-Orozco (Immigration Initiative at Harvard)
  • Dr. Norman Ornstein (American Enterprise Institute)
  • Julia Preston (The Marshall Project)

Aired June 2022 Global Connections aired by American Friends of Rabin Medical Center (AFRMC), a 501(c)(3) nonprofit charitable organization established in 1995 and located in New York City.


Jul 26, 2022 - Holding Fast: Resilience and Civic Engagement Among Latino Immigrants

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Michael Jones-Correa, University of Pennsylvania
Abstract: Have the policies and rhetoric of Trump’s candidacy and administration undermined immigrants’ trajectories of political inclusion? Drawing from original surveys of Latino immigrants spanning the period Trump won the Republican nomination, to when he was elected to the presidency and took office, Holding Fast charts patterns of civic resilience and withdrawal among these foreign-born residents, both citizens and non-citizens. However, despite the rhetoric and policy threat of Trump’s candidacy and presidency, this research finds Latino immigrants demonstrate far more civic resilience than withdrawal.

Speaker bio: Michael Jones-Correa is President’s Distinguished Professor of Political Science and Director, Center for the Study of Ethnicity, Race and Immigration (CSERI). He is author of Holding Fast: Resilience and Civic Engagement Among Latino Immigrants (Russell Sage Foundation). His research centers on the topics of immigrant political incorporation and ethnic and racial relations in the United States, often writing about political behavior in the context of institutional structures.


Oct 23, 2020 - Holding Fast: Resilience and Civic Engagement Among Latino Immigrants

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Speaker: Michael Jones-CorreaSpeaker

bio: Michael Jones-Correa is President’s Distinguished Professor of Political Science and Director, Center for the Study of Ethnicity, Race and Immigration (CSERI). He is author of Holding Fast: Resilience and Civic Engagement Among Latino Immigrants (Russell Sage Foundation). His research centers on the topics of immigrant political incorporation and ethnic and racial relations in the United States, often writing about political behavior in the context of institutional structures.

Abstract: Have the policies and rhetoric of Trump’s candidacy and administration undermined immigrants’ trajectories of political inclusion? Drawing from original surveys of Latino immigrants spanning the period Trump won the Republican nomination, to when he was elected to the presidency and took office, Holding Fast charts patterns of civic resilience and withdrawal among these foreign-born residents, both citizens and non-citizens. However, despite the rhetoric and policy threat of Trump’s candidacy and presidency, this research finds Latino immigrants demonstrate far more civic resilience than withdrawal.


Oct 07, 2020 - Here, There, and Elsewhere: The Making of Immigrant Identities in a Globalized World, with Tahseen Shams

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Spearker: Tahseen Shams

Speakerbio: Tahseen Shams is Assistant Professor of Sociology and author of Here, There, and Elsewhere: The Making of Immigrant Identities in a Globalized World (Stanford University Press). Her research explores how transnational, global forms of inequality intersect with race and ethnicity to affect immigrant groups, particularly those coming from Muslim-majority countries to the United States and Canada.

Abstract: Challenging the commonly held perception that immigrants’ lives are shaped exclusively by their sending and receiving countries, Here, There, and Elsewhere breaks new ground by showing how immigrants are vectors of globalization who both produce and experience the interconnectedness of societies—not only the societies of origin and destination, but also, the societies in places beyond. Tahseen Shams posits a new concept for thinking about these places that are neither the immigrants’ homeland nor hostland—the “elsewhere.” Drawing on rich ethnographic data, interviews, and analysis of the social media activities of South Asian Muslim Americans, Shams uncovers how different dimensions of the immigrants’ ethnic and religious identities connect them to different elsewheres in places as far-ranging as the Middle East, Europe, and Africa. Yet not all places in the world are elsewheres. How a faraway foreign land becomes salient to the immigrant’s sense of self depends on an interplay of global hierarchies, homeland politics, and hostland dynamics. Referencing today’s 24-hour news cycle and the ways that social media connects diverse places and peoples at the touch of a screen, Shams traces how the homeland, hostland, and elsewhere combine to affect the ways in which immigrants and their descendants understand themselves and are understood by others.


Sep 30, 2020 - The Mobility Pathways of Migrant Domestic Workers with Rhacel Salazar Parreñas

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Spearker: Rhacel Salazar Parreñas

Speaker bio: Rhacel Salazar Parreñas is Professor of Sociology and Gender and Sexuality Studies. She writes on the migration of women from the Philippines with a focus on domestic work. She is the author of Servants of Globalization: Migration and Domestic Work (Stanford University Press). She is currently the Vice President of the American Sociological Association.Abstract: In this talk, I identify and examine the mobility pathways of migrant domestic workers, meaning the course of action they undertake to secure continuous employment. Mobility pathways refer not only to migratory practices and processes but also concern shifts in one’s employment, legal and social status. Migration and Domestic Work, Second Edition | Rhacel Salazar ParreñasThis talk examines the mobility pathways of migrant domestic workers in order to interrogate the possibilities of socio-economic mobility allowed by their migration in a stratified global labor market. Drawing from 85 in-depth interviews conducted with Filipino migrant domestic workers employed in the key destination of the United Arab Emirates, this talk identifies three salient mobility pathways of serial migration, staggered migration and return migration. It revisits our understanding in labor migration studies of the intersections of social and spatial mobility as it first establishes the salience of multi-national migrations, thus disrupting the assumption of the continuous settlement of migrants in any one destination, and second illustrates the social reproduction of poverty for unskilled migrant workers, thus dispelling the notion that migration offers an inevitable path to socio-economic mobility.