Newsroom

Jacqueline Bhabha: Supreme Court’s ‘Dreamers’ decision just a first step

July 22, 2020

IIH Executive Committee member Jacqueline Bhabha writes on the Supreme Court's DACA decision for the Financial Times:

"Since September 2017, the “Dreamers” who had benefited from Daca have been living on a knife’s edge."


"Thousands of the Daca-mented have suffered from crushing anxiety because of the insecurities associated with their status; some at Harvard have sought medical...

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Jacqueline Bhabha: Europe shows a Janus face to migrants

July 20, 2020

IIH Executive Committee member Jacqueline Bhabha writes on EU immigration for the Financial Times:

 "There is still a refugee crisis in Europe: a crisis of protection, of care, and of social inclusion."

"Today, neither Greece nor the EU have the resources or the political will of [Germany's] initial refugee response."

Refugees in Greece "confront the withering...

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Gonzales to the New York Times: DACA is "the most successful immigration policy in recent decade”

June 18, 2020

(New York Times)

Roberto G. Gonzales, a Harvard professor who has been studying DACA since it went into effect in 2012, calls it “the most successful immigration policy in recent decades.”

Gonzales explains: “Within a year, DACA beneficiaries were already taking giant steps. They found new jobs. They increased their earnings. They acquired driver’s licenses. And they began to build credit through opening bank accounts and...

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Upholding Non-Discrimination Principles in the Covid-19 Outbreak

May 1, 2020

(Carr Center for Human Rights Policy)

Carr Center faculty and fellows discuss how we can employ principles of non-discrimination to address the pandemic’s disproportionate impact on our most vulnerable communities.

In our third Covid-19 Discussion Paper, Professor of the Practice of Health and Human Rights, Jacqueline Bhabha; Technology and Human Rights Fellows Laurin Leonard and Teresa Hodge; and Carr Center Fellow, Laura Cordisco-Tsai, outline how Covid-19 disproportionately impacts the world's most vulnerable communities....

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The Slur I Never Expected to Hear in 2020

April 14, 2020

(New York Times Magazine)

Cathy Park Hong

As an Asian-American, I’ve been conditioned to a certain kind of unspoken racism. This pandemic has unmasked how vicious it really is.

Early in February, I read unsupported speculations that a virus ravaging a distant city called Wuhan was due to a Chinese taste for a strange scaled mammal called the pangolin, which resembles an anteater but is cuddlier than its lumbering tube-snouted look-alike. Around that time, during a dinner party, I laughed when a friend quipped: “How...

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New IIH Report Highlights the Disturbing Impact of U.S. Immigration Enforcement on the Nation's Schools

February 5, 2020

The Immigration Initiative at Harvard (IIH) today released a new report, “Under Siege: The Disturbing Impact of Immigration Enforcement on the Nation’s Schools,” which reveals that nearly 85 percent of educators report observing students’ overt expressions of fear of an Immigration and Customs...

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Immigration Initiative at Harvard Seeks Research Assistant

January 14, 2020

The Immigration Initiative at Harvard (IIH) is recruiting a Research Assistant to work for up to 12 hours a week (hours to be confirmed depending on the successful candidate’s academic status), beginning 1 March 2020 for five months, with the possibility of extension. The candidate should have an existing Harvard affiliation. The main aims of the role will include facilitating the IIH team with the organization of events and administrative tasks related to a forthcoming conference on the topic of immigration. The Research Assistant will be expected to spend at least one day a week in the...

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U.S. Extends Temporary Work Permits for El Salvador Immigrants

October 28, 2019

"Eager to seal a deal with El Salvador to curb a surge of migrants to the southwestern border, the Trump administration on Monday agreed to special legal protections that would allow an estimated 250,000 Salvadorans to stay and work in the United States for an additional year.

The announcement walks back an earlier decision to strip Temporary Protected Status in January from these Salvadoran immigrants, many of whom have resided lawfully in the United States for nearly two decades...

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Announcing the Immigration Initiative at Harvard

September 18, 2019

New university-wide effort, launched with support from HGSE, aims to spur research, policy, and action on immigration.

"The Immigration Initiative at Harvard (IIH) — a new university-wide effort launched today — will bring together Harvard students, researchers, and policy leaders to advance innovative research about immigration. Led by Harvard Graduate School of Education Professor Roberto Gonzales,...
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Harvard EdCast: Understanding Immigration with Roberto Gonzales

September 18, 2019

Harvards EdCast interviews IIH Director Roberto Gonzales

Harvard Professor Roberto Gonzales thinks we need to better understand its implications and how it affects everyday life — not just for immigrant communities but for the country as a whole. In this episode, Gonzales discusses the immigration crisis in America and his new effort, the Immigration Initiative at Harvard, that connects researchers, policymakers, and immigrant communities...

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Telling the Untold Stories with Ariana Aparicio Aguilar, IIH Staff Member

June 2, 2019

Telling the untold stories: IIH staff member Ariana Aparicio Aguilar spoke with the Harvard Gazette on an event about the experiences of deportees and returnees.

"The panel — people who have researched the topic, worked in the field, or been personally affected — said that the experiences of returning from extended stays in the U.S. vary widely, with some finding fulfilling career and educational opportunities and others struggling to overcome significant cultural differences and even discrimination. They reflected that the experience for both the returnees and the families they left behind is difficult, but it does get easier."

“They could tell that I didn’t grow up there. My accent was different. My mannerisms were different. … I think that was the hardest part, realizing that I was not Mexican enough and not American because I lack this piece of paper.” - Ariana Aparicio Aguilar


Read more at the Harvard Gazette

Roberto Gonzales: Mentors Make the Difference

May 15, 2019

IIH Director Roberto Gonzales spoke with the Harvard Gazette on how high-achieving DACA recipients had help along the way from families and communities

“I found that the difference was, the high achievers could name three or more mentors,” Gonzales said at a community lecture and discussion at the Harvard Ed Portal in Allston. “Mentors who were there for them at crucial times in their lives.”

He encouraged audience members to think about what they can do, directly or indirectly, to help create a supportive environment for undocumented children and adolescents.

“If immigration reform is not going to happen this year, and people have urgent needs, who will it be to meet those needs?” he said. “We [community members] have the opportunity to pitch in.”

Read more at the Harvard Gazette

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Roberto Gonzales: I’m a Researcher. Here’s What Happened When I Traded Activism for Social Science

January 15, 2019

IIH Director Roberto Gonzales writes in Education Week:

"Finding my voice as a public scholar didn't happen overnight"

"I am now at the stage of my career where I am comfortable being a public scholar. I have been very fortunate to find diverse outlets for my work, and my research has provided me an evidence base that is sought after by a varied group of national and local actors—policymakers, community and school leaders, and practitioners. But in my early years in academia I struggled to find my voice as a public scholar."

"Prior to my academic career, I was a youth organizer in an immigrant community in Chicago. In that role, I lived in the neighborhood, and I was embedded in community life. That experience fundamentally shaped my political orientation."

Read more from Roberto Gonzales in Education Week.

 

Roberto Gonzales: Why DACA Works

September 17, 2018

New research from IIH Director Roberto Gonzales shows that immigrant students with DACA status experience smoother transitions to adulthood.

"Gonzales and his co-authors describe adolescence for undocumented immigrants as “a waking nightmare,” a time when young people realize that the goals they had thought possible are, in fact, out of their reach because of their immigration status. He described this uncomfortable awakening in his 2015 book, Lives in Limbo...

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Harvard Gazette: A Celebration of Immigration

March 6, 2018

"At a workshop on immigrants’ rights held Monday morning at the Memorial Church, attorneys Jason Corral and Cindy Zapata of the Harvard Immigration & Refugee Clinical Program shared legal advice on how to deal with the more aggressive enforcement of immigration laws under the Trump administration. Corral has provided legal services to at least 60 undocumented students studying at Harvard."

"The event was part of the DACA Seminar, a series of daylong events on campus to highlight, among other things, the future of the federal program known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), an Obama-era initiative that protects young immigrants from deportation."

Read more in the Harvard Gazette.