Americo Mendoza Mori

Americo Mendoza-Mori

Américo Mendoza-Mori is an interdisciplinary scholar trained in literary, linguistic and cultural studies. At Harvard’s Committee on Ethnicity, Migration, Rights (EMR) he researches and teaches courses on Latinx and Indigenous communities.

Mendoza-Mori’s work has appeared in a variety of academic journals, has been presented at the United Nations, and has been featured in The New York Times, a TEDx talk, BBC, NPR, Remezcla. Previously, Dr. Mendoza-Mori acted as the founding coordinator of the University of Pennsylvania’s Quechua program, co-founder of The Quechua Alliance, and co-founder of the Thinking Andean Studies international conference. Additionally, he has been involved in educational, community-based initiatives and Indigenous language reclamation projects in Peru, Ecuador, Bolivia and the United States.

At Harvard he is the Faculty Director of the Latinx Studies Working Group and has recently launched the Quechua Initiative on Global Indigeneity.

Michael Vazquez

Michael Ángel Vázquez

Michael Ángel Vázquez is a fourth-year PhD student in the Culture, Institutions, and Society concentration in the Education department. The proud son of formerly undocumented migrants from México, Michael’s research focuses on building coalitions among young people, particularly around social causes related to migration. As a qualitative researcher, he hopes to engage in portraiture and ethnographic methods to facilitate his dissertation work and analysis. Prior to beginning his graduate studies, he spent four years as a teacher and two years conducting research in schools at the Mexico-California border. While at Harvard, Michael’s been involved as a resident tutor for Adams House, a student leader for the Latinx Student Association and LGBTQ@GSAS, a GSAS Student Center Fellow, and an organizer for the Alumni of Color Conference at HGSE. At HGSE and GSAS, he is a fierce advocate for Ethnic Studies and has served as a teaching fellow for various courses within the field. During his free time, he’s probably watching a soccer game (Viva México!), listening to a podcast, or walking along the Charles River.

Farah Mallah

Farah Mallah

Farah Mallah is a PhD student in Education & Policy Evaluation. Her research focuses on the interplay between migration and education. This includes examining the impact of migration on education enrollment in the home country, and the impact of access to education in the host country on migrant outcomes. Prior to her doctoral studies, Farah worked as a Research Analyst in the Education and Crime Labs at the University of Chicago. Farah holds a BSc in Economics from Georgetown University and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard.

Edom Tesfa

Edom Tesfa

Edom Tesfa is a critical education researcher with an interest in the experiences of Black immigrant-origin adolescents in the United States. Her scholarship draws from Black studies, migration studies, sociology, anthropology, and critical race theory. Edom’s dissertation is an ethnography of Black immigrant-origin high school students in Maine – an emerging destination for African immigrants and refugees – and their experiences of care amidst anti-Black racism, xenophobia, and the COVID-19 pandemic. At Harvard, Edom has served as a Teaching Fellow in courses on immigrant education and critical participatory action research (CPAR). She holds a B.S. in Foreign Service – Culture and Politics from Georgetown University and an A.M. in Education from Harvard University. In her free time, she enjoys gaming and taking care of her dog, Pepper.

Gladys Aguilar

Gladys Aguilar

Gladys Aguilar is an advanced Ph.D. candidate in the Human Development, Learning and Teaching strand at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Drawing on her background as an immigrant from México, as well as on her professional experience as a child and family therapist and as a bilingual classroom teacher working with Latinx immigrant families, her research agenda has as a central focus the educational success and psychosocial well-being of immigrant-origin Latinx children and youth..

 Guided by Garcia Coll and Colleagues’ (1996) integrative model of minoritized children’s development, Gladys’ work applies an ecocultural framework to investigate Latinx children’s bilingual and ethnic-racial identity development and the individual and contextual factors that inform these culturally adaptive developmental competencies. Her dissertation analyzes longitudinally the Spanish and English language development of young Mexican-origin children across the ages of 3, 4 and 5 years and examines the language features, cultural characteristics and family ethnic socialization practices of their immigrant-origin mothers that shape this development. Through the findings of her dissertation and other research projects, her work endeavors to deepen our understanding of the positive development of Latinx children and elucidate the linguistic and cultural resources of their families.

Maurice Crul

Maurice Crul

Maurice Crul is a distinguished professor of Sociology at the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam. He is a specialist on school and labor market careers of children of immigrants and refugees in Europe and the United States. He has coordinated the TIES project which was the first European comparative study on the second generation in Europe. He has further coordinated two ERC Grant projects. The first looked at the upcoming elite among the second generation (ELITESproject.eu) and the second, an ERC advanced grant project, BAM looks at the new minority in superdiverse cities: the people without migration background living in majority minority neighborhoods (BAMproject.eu). He has written more than a hundred journal and chapter articles about issues of diversity and inclusion. Some of his books include: The New Face of World Cities (Russell Sage Foundation Publishers), Coming to Terms with Superdiversity. The Case of Rotterdam (Springer Press), Superdiversity. A New Vision on Integration (Free University Press) and New Social Mobility. Second Generation Pioneers in Europe (Springer Press).

Denise Brennan

Denise Brennan

Denise Brennan is Professor and Chair of the Department of Anthropology and Faculty Co-Director of the Gender+ Justice Initiative at Georgetown University. Her scholarship focuses on borders, migration, climate change, trafficking, policing, and sex work. She has conducted anthropological field research with the first survivors of human trafficking to the United States, undocumented individuals and mixed-status families living inside the “100-Mile Border Zone,” and women who migrate internally to sell sex in tourist zones in the Dominican Republic. She has just begun the field research for a new book on displacement and dispossession through wildfire with migrant workers who work near the fire line as well as with migrant “disaster workers” who clean up after extreme weather events.

She is the author of Life Interrupted: Trafficking into Forced Labor in the United States and What’s Love Got to Do with It? Transnational Desires and Sex Tourism in the Dominican Republic, both with Duke University Press. She is currently finishing a new book, The Border is Everywhere: Policing Everyday Life in An Era of Mass Deportation, and has begun the field research for a book on climate change: Life Amidst Fire: Climate Change, Migration, and Work. She has held residential fellowships at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Princeton, N.J., and the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C. Her research also has been supported by the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation, the American Association of University Women, and the Fulbright Program. She is an Advisor to the Best Practices Policy Project, and has been a board member of Different Avenues, and HIPS — organizations that work to protect the rights of people who engage in the sex sector. She also founded the Trafficking Survivor Leadership Training Fund that provides support for trafficking survivor-advocates.

carola suarez orozco

Carola Suárez-Orozco

Carola Suárez-Orozco is a Professor in Residence at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and the Director of the Immigration Initiative at Harvard. She is also the co-founder of Re-Imagining Migration

Using mixed-methodological strategies, her work focuses on elucidating the child, adolescent, and young adult experience of immigration—how is their development shaped by immigration and how are they changed by the process? She has studied a wide variety of processes including identity formation, family separations, civic engagement, and the unauthorized experience. A focus on school settings has been an essential and enduring theme in her basic research agenda as schools are a first contact point between the immigrant children, their families, and the new society.

Her books include: Children of Immigration (Harvard University Press), Learning a New Land (Harvard University Press), Transitions: The Development of the Children of Immigrants (New York University Press), Education: Our Global Compact in a Time of Crisis (Columbia University Press), as well as Immigrant-Origin Students in Community College (Teachers’ College Press) among others.

She has been awarded an American Psychological Association (APA) Presidential Citation for her contributions to the understanding of cultural psychology of immigration, has served as Chair of the APA Presidential Task Force on Immigration, and is a member of the National Academy of Education.

Kongji Qin

Kongji Qin

Dr. Kongji Qin is an Assistant Professor of Language Education in the Department of Teaching and Learning at New York University’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. As a transnational scholar trained in both China and the United States, Dr. Qin’s research centers on understanding and addressing inequality in and through language and literacy education of immigrant youth in U.S. schools. Drawing on critical race theories, gender studies, poststructuralist theories, postcolonial theories, and discourse analysis, his research is driven by questions that lie at the axes of immigration, language, pedagogy, identity, and justice. His work features three interconnected research programs: understanding the relationship between immigrant adolescents’ negotiation of racialized masculinities and language learning, preparing linguistically responsive content teachers for immigrant students, and addressing educational inequality through antiracist pedagogies and critical participatory action research (PAR) with immigrant youth.

Dr. Qin is currently leading the Immigration Literacy & Dignity Project, supported by the NAEd/Spencer Postdoctoral Fellowship. In this critical PAR project, he collaborates with both teachers and immigrant youth to explore how an intergenerational research collective of educators, students, activists and university-based researchers can support immigrant youth to engage in critical inquiry and linguistic activism to counteract xenophobia and racism.

sarah dryden peterson

Sarah Dryden Peterson